How can we fix our political system?

That’s the topic Nick Clegg is (rightly!) talking about in this evening’s Liberal Democrat broadcast on TV. But you can watch it now:

(The film is also on YouTube here.)

Nick Clegg has laid out not only what needs reform – but also a timetable to achieve it. Sorting out the future of democracy in this country demands radical reforms to both sweep away the stench of fiddling and chiseling – and to seize the opportunity that the expenses scandal offers to break the stranglehold of the establishment, both Tory and Labour (who have voted time and time again to retain the status quo and hide the facts). That establishment grip has been unshakeable – until now.

Bring it on!

0 thoughts on “How can we fix our political system?

  1. While I’d say that Nick Clegg’s announcement is a welcome push forward on some important issues, he doesn’t go far enough in some places. For example, why only institute the ability to recall MPs who are condemned by an unelected committee? If the power of MPs emanates from the people, surely the voters should have the ability to recall them at any time?If people think that the ability for the people to trigger a by-election should be enshrined in law, you should check out the 38Degrees campaign for a national recall law: http://www.38degrees.org.uk/page/s/recall

  2. There is much more to the Establishment than MPs, and also replacing them with a dictatorship of the proletariat doesn’t seem right. Equality means all have a right to be involved in decision making, so we have to ensure that the Establishment come and engage with the rest of us (recently after a frustrating afternoon in a Workshop on an aspect of the law, one of them at last began to talk – and revealed how out of date they are).

  3. And another one: 38degrees’ web site is not one that you should use – see the article on spyblog http://spyblog.org.uk/ about privacy risks with it. Also the web site doesn’t give legally required information about its owner (which is actually the Progressive Majority company). Sloppy isn’t strong enough a word for it.