Minister wants kids to see F-word film!

That was the headline in the Sunday Times – and yes I do want kids age 12 and over to see Made in Dagenham – the film that portrays a hugely important part of our social history.

Made in Dagenham tells the tale of the women who came out on strike from the Ford Dagenham plant because they were paid less than their male counterparts.
Yes – there is some bad language – but this is an important film. And given what can be seen by children all over the place that is really offensive – like the way women are often treated as objects in music videos or lads’ mags – the idea that you can restrict something this good from youngsters under 15 seems wrong.

I hope the British Board of Film Classification will reconsider their decision and give it the 12A certificate it merits. The equal pay act was spawned by these women’s fight for equality – and we are still fighting today. The attitudinal behaviour between the genders starts very early – the sooner both boys and girls are aware and find understanding the better.

0 thoughts on “Minister wants kids to see F-word film!

  1. That’s perfectly sensible. I would have let me daughter watch this when she was 12 (although she might well have been embarrassed if I were present at the same time). Fathers need protecting from this kind of language.

  2. There’s no such thing as a 12 certificate – it’s 12A, which means kids under 12 can go see it too provided they have an adult with them.

    And the C in BBFC stands for “Classification”, not “Censors” (it takes 0.19 seconds for Google to tell you that).

    And Made in Dagenham would not have been made without support from the UK Film Council, which you and Nick Clegg are scrapping.

    Apart from that, another great post, Lynne!

  3. ALexandra Palace – thanks for corrections – done. ps the money that the UK Film Coundil gave out will still be given out as far as I understand – just not with UK Film overheads.

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  5. I’d rather children were exposed to swear words and heard about genuine discrimination against women rather than some of the feminist lies we see today about pay gaps and the impact of the recession/cuts.

  6. Perhaps we should have a ban on Harriet Harman and Vera Baird going within 100m of schools but let everyone see this film.

  7. Agreed that kids should be encouraged to see this film.

    Yes, it is about female equality and poor treatment of women. However, it also sends a clear message that fair treatment and equality will not be handed out, automatically, to disadvantaged minorities. Such groups must fight hard (and increasingly dirty!) to be treated with equality and dignity.